The Legend of Rader Rahn

He was well known as a Blade Dancer before becoming a royal guard and later consort to Queen Asyria of Gerryn. It wasn’t until his last stand in Adlam on Laskanda did his reputation grow and his heroic feats became more legend than historical fact.

While many scholars believe many feats attributed to Rahn were actually done by other Blade Dancers, historians have pinpointed several missions that Rahn likely participated in. Chief among them was the rescue of young Prince Cael of Faolán. The description of one of the Blade Dancers involved bore the distinctive tattoos of Rader Rahn. The missions was thought to be suicidal, but for the fact that Rahn and his Blade Dancer partner returned almost unscathed. The only serious wound was Rahn’s eye. He was fortunate not to have lost it, but he did receive one of his more distinctive scars.

What many scholars find interesting is that the males of the Rahn family have stylized tattoos of the scar over the same eye in honour of their ancestor and thus claim direct descent (some believe this may be a leftover Symterran tradition).

Another incident was when he lived in Aearion and competed in a ritual combat competition to become a royal guard of the Rulers of Aearion. He was denied this, due to the xenophobic nature of the rulers. Queen Asyria famously proclaimed, “If Aearion does not want such a splendid warrior, Gerryn would gladly accept him.”

It was not the acts of the rulers that impressed the crowd, but Rahn’s skill with a blade. His prowess was exaggerated over time to the point that he had been the sole victor instead of one of a select few that remained at the end of the tournament.

His last stand on Laskanda is by and far his most famous. While it is known the history books are often ignored and the legend of how he and a small group of brave warriors fought against the leviathan.

According to the legend, Adlam, the capital city of the empire, came under attack. The emperor ordered his soldiers to attack it, but none of the Laskandian weapons could pierce its hide. Rader Rahn, knowing that his blade was made of star metal, offered his services. The emperor was thankful, but declined his offer. On the second day of the siege, Rader Rahn again offered his services and the emperor once again declined, reminding him and Queen Asyria that they were guests on his world. He would not ask guests to fight his battles. On the third day Rader Rahn offered again, and the emperor – after seeing the extent of the destruction of his city – finally agreed.

Rader hand picked six warriors to accompany him. After the leviathan went back out to sea, they devised a plan of attack, and on the fourth day they battled the sea monster. The battle raged for six days and six nights.

On the morning of the seventh day, the seven warriors were reduced to two: Rader Rahn and the youngest of the six warriors. At dawn Rader Rahn – bleeding heavily from many wounds – told the young warrior to fall back to a safe distance. When he would not go, Rader Rahn ordered him to, with a reminder that someone needed to live to tell everyone what happened. The youngest warrior reluctantly left and from one of the tallest towers remaining in Adlam, he watched Rader Rahn’s last battle unfold. Rader Rahn allowed himself to be snatched up by the leviathan. After struggling free, the knight ran up the spine of the sea monster and drove his blade into its head. With a mighty roar the leviathan thrashed about, finally collapsing into the sea.

With a cry, the young warrior climbed down from his perch and hurried to the harbor. After a day of searching he found Rader Rahn washed up on the beach. Close to death, the knight gave the young warrior his sword, asking he return it to his queen to give to their unborn child. Promising the dying knight that he would do his bidding, he stayed with Rader Rahn until he drew his last breath. It was with a heavy heart that he returned Rader Rahn’s fabled blade to Queen Asyria.

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